Pit Blinds For Duck Hunting

PIT BLINDS FOR DUCK HUNTING : THE GREATEST LIGHT IS THE GREATEST SHADE : TRAVEL TRAILER CANOPY

Pit Blinds For Duck Hunting

pit blinds for duck hunting

    duck hunting

  • (duck hunter) hunter of ducks
  • ducking: hunting ducks

    pit blinds

  • A small trench in the earth that serves as a ground blind. Usually has wood, plastic or metal sides to keep the sides from sloughing off into the blind. Most often used by waterfowl hunters.

pit blinds for duck hunting – The Ultimate

The Ultimate Guide to Calling and Decoying Waterfowl: Tips and Tactics for Hunting Ducks and Geese
The Ultimate Guide to Calling and Decoying Waterfowl: Tips and Tactics for Hunting Ducks and Geese
The sport of hunting ducks and geese is alive and quite well in North America, thanks in large part to a resurgence of waterfowl numbers, which, in turn, can be traced to conservation groups such as Ducks Unlimited and Delta Waterfowl, Inc., as well as to sportsmen who impose limits on themselves far stricter than those issued by the law.

Assembling the gear, fixing the decoys, working with the Labs and Chesapeakes, caring for the firearms, fixing the blinds or duck boats, and always looking for more hotspots to hunt, waterfowlers are a breed unto themselves.

In these pages, read how to become adept at all aspects of duck and goose hunting-how to set the decoys in various conditions, how to call for the various species at different times of the year, how to get out there on the marsh or grain field and collect birds.

Day 46 – Duck Hunt

Day 46 - Duck Hunt
Off the bat, one thing I love about Duck Hunt was the fact this was a NES pack-in game. A Nintendo Entertainment System, along with Super Mario Bros/ Duck Hunt (+Zapper). That was one hell of a console bundle right there…

I like how It wasn’t even me who asked for this either, it was my parents, I was too young to even know what video games were at that precise time, so the NES was a prized possession of my parent’s before video games started to have there sick/ delightful way with me.

I’m sure for many of us, Duck Hunt was our very first novelty video game peripheral. Waaaaaay before the likes of MTV Games and Activision could load us up on plastic instruments.

There isn’t really much of a story I have to tell in regards to Duck Hunt. It was a great early days home console light gun game for sure, if you played it I’m sure you’d agree. It was a bit on the shallow side perhaps, you really had to seek out the other few light gun games that got released on the NES to really get the most out of your "ZAPPER", although at least once a year (for about a decade) the temptation to have a quick play on Duck Hunt would always resurface, especially with friends round.

I do have some fond memories of learning of ways to cheat the game (shooting at house lights or candles to trick the sensors), and it will remain one of gamings biggest teases that we couldn’t save the ducks, and use our ammo on that damn cheeky bastard dog! (although Newgrounds.com has you covered if you still want to seek revenge on that friggin mutt).

Duck Hunt (or "still life with duckweed")

Duck Hunt (or "still life with duckweed")
(my first photo taken while wearing waders!)

Yesterday was the opening day of duck hunting season in Maine. It was a beautiful morning–50 deg F, little fog, autumn colors, and lots of birds. I’m not a big hunter, but hunting does help me keep perspective on where my food comes from. It is an important annual ritual for me.

There is a strange dichotomy of being in such a wild, beautiful place and the death/destruction aspect of hunting. If you are a carnivore, consider going hunting as it teaches an invaluable lesson on your place in the food chain!

pit blinds for duck hunting

Misery Loves Company: Waterfowling and the Relentless Pursuit of Self-Abuse
This book takes a fun-filled look at the foibles, follies, pratfalls, and unpredictable world of the duck hunter, from the time his alarm rings at 3:00 a.m. until he stumbles into freezing marsh water two hours later, swamping his waders but not dampening his enthusiasm for the sport. Why do duck hunters do it? Sit in driving rain for hours awaiting ducks that may never come? Shiver in freezing boats and blinds in the most inaccessible, not to mention inhospitable, environs imaginable?
Author-photographer Bill Buckley writes about these magic moments with humor and verve, but it is his brilliant color photographs that steal the show. The hapless hunter who watches helplessly as his partner’s Suburban backs out of the driveway-and over the gun case that holds his favorite shotgun. Click! The faithful retriever that elegantly lifts its leg and makes a sop of the hunter’s blind bag. Click! And the pained expressions on the faces of duck hunters caught in the act of “enjoying” their favorite sport. Click.
Waterfowlers who sometimes question their own sanity can now take heart. “It’s all right,” Buckley writes, “if you like standing in swamp muck for hours on end. It’s okay if your family thinks you’re weird. Who cares if your girlfriend diagnoses you as obsessive-compulsive or sadomasochistic?
The important thing is, you’re not alone.”